Fraud and Scams

Yahoo customer service scam

Yahoo customer service scam
January 3, 2017
by Andrew Johnson
Consumer Education Specialist, FTC
Need to contact Yahoo customer care? There are a few ways to do so — but, Yahoo warns that phone is not an option. That’s right: any phone number you come across in an internet search, claiming to connect you with Yahoo customer care, is fake.

Here at the FTC, we’ve gotten reports that consumers who called these fake customer care numbers were offered “Yahoo customer care services” for a fee.

But the truth is, Yahoo customer support is always free of charge. That means you should never pay to have your Yahoo password reset, for technical support, or help with security concerns. Also, Yahoo won’t ask to remotely connect to your computer for any support-related request.

https://www.consumer.ftc.gov/blog/yahoo-customer-service-scam?utm_source=govdelivery
Tech Support Imposter Scams
Callers impersonate legitimate technical support companies to fool computer users into handing over their personal information or sending money.
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For more, read about tech support scams and ways to review your Yahoo account’s security.

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Fraud and Scams

The top three ways to avoid fraud

August 26, 2016

by

Jennifer Leach
Assistant Director, Division of Consumer and Business Education
In pretty much every article and blog post we put out, you’ll find tips to help you avoid scams. The idea is that, if you can spot a scam, and know how to avoid it, you and your money are more likely to stay together.

Today, we’re releasing a brochure that distills those tips down to the top 10 ways to avoid fraud. This brochure – available online and in print – is your one-stop resource to help you spot imposters, know what to do about robocalls, and how to check out a scammer’s claims.

Here are three things that can help you avoid scammers who try to call you:

Hang up on robocalls. If you pick up the phone and hear a recorded sales pitch, hang up and report it to the FTC. These calls are illegal. And plentiful. Don’t press 1, 2 or any number to get off a list or speak to a person. That just means you’ll get even more calls.
Don’t trust your caller ID. Scammers can make caller ID look like anyone is calling: the IRS, a business or government office…even your own phone number. If they tell you to pay money for any reason, or ask for your financial account numbers, hang up.  If you think the caller might be legitimate, call back to a number you know is genuine – not the number the caller gave you.
Talk to someone. Before you give up money or information, talk to someone you trust. Scammers want you to make decisions in a hurry. Slow down, check out the story, search online – or just tell a friend. We find that people who talk to someone – anyone – are much less likely to fall for a scam.
For seven more tips to help protect yourself and loved ones from fraud, read on – or order your free copies of 10 Things You Can Do to Avoid Fraud to share in your community. And if you spot something that looks like a scam, report it to the FTC.